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Efficient SUP progression – learn to use the stand up paddle gear you have, well.

If you’re a stand up paddler looking to progress, in whatever discipline you choose, then chances are you already own the applicable SUP kit. The problem with progression, however, can be frustration. Frustration at not moving forwards quick enough; frustration of not getting over that plateau efficiently; frustration at lack of consistency. Often the frustrated stand up paddler in question may put it down to their equipment. It’s an easy trap to fall into with much marketing hype doing the rounds on social media and such. Seeing the next best thing and how that’s ‘guaranteed’ to evolved your stand up paddling is ‘selling the dream’ in the most in your face fashion.

Pics, but more likely videos, of that supposed magical piece of SUP gear in action (often a stand up paddle board) is enough to make anybody salivate. Yet what many forget is the paddler using the kit is probably a gifted athlete, whose job it is to SUP and who gets wet on a daily basis. Basically they’re pro and paid to be one.

But we’re all guilty of being lured by the marketing machine. Pretty soon, believing your next purchase will solve all woes, hard earned cash is leaving your wallet and a new, shiny bit of SUP kit is winging its way to you.

We spoken to enough experienced SUP paddlers in our time and they all concur: you can pretty much achieve a lot with your existing gear. Learning how to use it/ride and paddle it well will put you in a great place for progression. Chopping and changing gear isn’t needed. Racers can podium on their current machine and surfers can carve and slide on their trusty 10fter. Learning the ropes and acquiring those much needed paddle skills is something that should be focused on before swapping out your current SUP equipment for the umpteenth time.

Now don’t get us wrong. We’re not suggesting you shouldn’t upgrade. Of course, if you’ve been riding something aimed squarely at beginners then maybe it’s time for change. What we’re suggesting is NOT part exing and buying new SUP gear every couple of weeks. Believe us when we say we’ve seen this happen a lot with SUP over the years. Instead, get on the horse as often as you possibly can. Get involved with varied conditions, focus on technique and consolidate all that knowledge you acquire. Put it into practice and you’ll be winning.